parenting

The Essential Key to Typing Babies and Toddlers

Written by david


When assessing your toddler or baby’s Type, remember this one essential key: movement.

All babies have the ability to play, learn, and have fun, especially in an environment where they feel comfortable and safe to be themselves. The movement with which they do so is distinct. Let’s look at all four of those movements expressed in toddlers and babies.

Type 1 Babies and Toddlers

Movement:

The Type 1 child’s movement is upward and light. They enjoy free movement where they can kick their legs. They look outside themselves to see what they can connect with and they enjoy interacting with a variety of locations, sights, and people. Their random, higher movement makes them less likely to adhere to a structured sleep schedule or accept doing the same thing at regular times. They love to be bounced and sung to playfully.

Features:

Their face has a cherub or pixie look to it, with a round structure and animated shapes in the features—like circles or star points. They make sounds that rise and fall and when they shout, they can easily reach a high-pitched shriek.

What to Notice:

If your baby or toddler is a Type 1, you will notice their higher movement. While all babies are “cute,” a Type 1 baby or toddler exudes the energy of cuteness with their social, outgoing nature. They seem friendly, more animated, and bright-eyed. If your young child does express a higher movement, but you are not sure if they are a Type 1 or a Type 3, consider the quality of their energy. A Type 1’s high energy feels like a bouncing ball (random and playful), while a Type 3’s higher energy feels more like a push forward momentum. Type 1 babies make cute, gurgling noises to entertain themselves.

Challenges:

Type 1 children thrive in environments that have a lot going on and a lot to stimulate their love for newness. If your baby is required to sit still for extended periods of time or is in too quiet of a house during the day, they may be bored and get fussy. If your toddler does not have the regular opportunity to interact with a variety of people, they may become grumpy or sad.

Child Whisperer Tip:

Sit your Type 1 child up in a swing or walker so they can engage with their world in an upright way. Mix up the locations where you put them so they always have something new to see. Turn on some upbeat music. Consider lovely scents you can add to their environment. Do they have toys that stimulate their curiosity and excitement for life? Make sure that as they grow into toddlers, they have plenty of opportunities to play and interact with other children.

Type 2 Babies and Toddlers

Movement:

While all babies offer an energy of love, Type 2s in particular have an energy that expresses a steady, heartfelt connection to those around them. They seem quieter, more tender and more sensitive than other babies from the earliest moments of their life.

Features:

Like their natural movement, the features in a Type 2 baby’s face will move downward with a blended quality. Cheeks blend into the jawline. The eyebrows, corners of their eyes, lips, everything will have a softened, downward quality to it. They may also have a quieter cry than most babies and will try to get your attention in subtle ways when they are hungry or tired.

What to Notice:

Other people will give you clues that your baby is a Type 2. The most common perception you’ll encounter (as long as baby’s comfy!) is that your child is so easy or so calm and mellow. These children have a quieter cry and all-around quieter affect to them. Their baby sounds are subtle and soft, which could be compared to a purring.

Challenges:

With their sensitive, relaxed nature, these children can experience challenges if things do not feel comfortable for them. You will have a fussy baby or a whiny toddler if clothes or sleeping arrangements are not comfortable, or they do not have a space to feel cozy in. They may also feel stressed if there is too much loud noise, like TV shows that have intense background music, or even quarreling parents or siblings. As they grow, these children do not have a natural tendency to speak up for what they need. So as they develop, they can whine, fuss, and get moody if they feel their needs are not heard.

Child Whisperer Tip:

Lucky for you, most items in the baby world are comfy and soft, which will support your Type 2 baby in feeling safe and cared for in this world. To prevent excessive whining, you need to consciously support them in learning to speak up. Make sure you do this in a way that’s supportive and comfortable to them, and does not communicate that their tendency toward subtlety is a flaw. If you are arguing or talking loudly, do it out of range of your Type 2 baby or toddler.

Type 3 Babies and Toddlers

Movement:

The Type 3 child’s movement is active, reactive, spirited, and fiery. Their energy has a forward push to it and they are focused on results. As babies, they get really hungry, nurse quickly and then they’re done. They crash, sleep hard, and then they’re up again. Baby or toddler, Type 3s are always ready to go, go, go.

Features:

Their faces have more textured, angular features that aren’t necessarily soft and cute. They have more substance in their nose, angular hairlines, texture in their hands, and cat eyes. For Type 3 girls, cute pink bows in contrast with more angular features will look a little silly. The Type 3 baby’s most distinguishing trait is the Type 3 scowl. They furrow their brow intensely, more than any other Type.

What to Notice:

Type 3 children express a higher movement like Type 1 children do. But Type 3 energy shows up as more pushy and adventurous, rather than bouncy and bright like a Type 1. Your Type 3 child will meet challenges head on. They make more guttural, growling sounds. As they learn to walk, they have a weighty, heavy-footed energy.

Challenges:

Because we expect babies to be soft and snuggly, parents don’t often expect a Type 3 child’s active movement or know what to do with it. From the beginning of a Type 3 child’s life, their parents may try to get them to stop moving. Because they want to get their hands on everything and they react to being told no, they can be labeled as rebellious, destructive, or pushy. They don’t have trouble, though, when sufficiently engaged.

Child Whisperer Tip:

Keep your Type 3 baby engaged with sounds and move them around to different spots in the house. This sort of variety will match their movement better than staying in the same place or too quiet of a home. To avoid the pushing they may do when they become toddlers, keep your Type 3 child physically engaged and provide safe places for them to roam and explore.

Don’t always tell them no. And when they do something big and unexpected, be impressed by it before anything else (“Wow, you’re so adventurous.” “That’s really cool you did something hard.”). Then you can say something like this: “What would help Mommy is for you to come and tell me so that I can support you in doing what you want.”

Type 4 Babies and Toddlers

Movement:

The Type 4 child’s energy moves inward, so they are naturally more reserved, particularly in new environments. They are supported by structure and repetition and will often start to create structure for themselves by falling asleep at the same time or wanting to eat on a schedule. Stillness does not mean sitting still (although they are more capable of it than the other three Types). It means an inner stillness, a quality of being grounded and centered, which you may sense from them, even when they are a baby.

Features:

Their most obvious facial feature is the shape of their face. It has a boxier look, with the sides of the face creating two parallel lines, and the forehead being more rectangular. They typically have eyebrows that go straight across, even if the eyebrows are faint. The sides of their fingers form parallel lines all the way to the ends of the fingers.

What to Notice:

Even at a very young age, these children focus intently on what holds their interest. Type 3 and Type 4 children tend to be independent, but with a different quality to their movement. Type 3 children will want to do something on their own because it’s a challenge. But Type 4s will want to do something by themselves because they want to figure it out. As they grow from babyhood to becoming a toddler, learn to recognize if your child is engaging with activities on an intellectual level, rather than a physical one

Challenges:

Type 4 babies will have a more serious expression than what you may expect in a baby. This still, authoritative quality is not a challenge, unless the baby is judged for not wanting to be passed to strangers or the toddler is told they need to smile more. Even at a very young age, these children want to be their own authority. As soon as they start attempting to communicate with you, they will express that they want to do things themselves. You can see this as an opportunity, rather than a challenge.

Child Whisperer Tip:

Offer your Type 4 baby structure with eating and sleeping schedules. Too much noise all the time can be very stressful for them, as their inner stillness requires periods of each day to be in a quiet environment. You may even find these babies enjoy lying in their cribs for a short period of time after they wake up from a nap, just to enjoy some solitude.

Knowing your baby or toddler’s true nature even before they can speak is a great gift to you as a parent, and it is a gift that you also give your child. It offers you a huge window of insight into your unique parent-child relationship. Your Child Whisperer skills give you an intuitive advantage to make decisions on behalf of your child in order to support them in feeling safe, loved, and cared for properly in a world that they are just getting to know!

You may have some thoughts or feelings about which Type your child is. What do you notice or remember about your child’s experience as a toddler? Take a moment to jot down your insights, or a few experiences you remember about how they moved, what they did, or what they said that might indicate your child’s Energy Type. In the next section, I’ll share some added tips to help you identify your child’s Type.

.

About the author

david

Leave a Comment